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2012-09-26 / Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Take notice that the Board of Supervisors of Chesterfield County, Virginia, at a scheduled meeting on Wednesday, October 10, 2012, at 630 p.m. in the County Public Meeting Room at the Chesterfield Administration Building, 10001 Iron Bridge Rd., Chesterfield, Virginia, will hold a public hearing where persons affected may appear and present their views to consider the “2035 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR CHESTERFIELD COUNTY,” which is Chesterfield County’s proposed new comprehensive plan (hereinafter referred to as “the Plan”). The Plan does not rezone property or change the uses or densities of property. BECAUSE THE PLAN MAKES LAND USE AND PLANNING RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING EVERY PARCEL OF LAND IN THE COUNTY, EVERY LANDOWNER SHOULD ATTEND A PUBLIC MEETING IN ORDER TO BE INFORMED AND, IF THE LANDOWNER DESIRES, TO SPEAK TO THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS ABOUT THE PLAN. All persons favoring opposing or interested in the above are invited to appear at time and place herein stated and may speak. More information about the proposed Plan can be found at www.chesterfield.gov/cp. A copy of the Plan is on file in Planning Department at Chesterfield County Community Development Building, 9800 Government Center Pkwy Chesterfield Virginia and at County Administrator’s Office, Room 504 at Chesterfield County Administration Building for public examination during regular business hrs 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. Please check first with the Planning Dept. Virginia law requires that all local governments have an adopted comprehensive plan. The law also requires that notice of public hearings relating to the proposed comprehensive plan be advertised, and that the advertisement contain a descriptive summary of the proposed plan. The Plan contains the following components set forth in chapter format: The Plan Overview, Welcome to Chesterfield County and Existing Conditions chapters provide introductory and background information about the County and the Plan including, among other things, information relating to County history, location, demographics, educational levels, employment, income, development patterns, commercial and industrial structures, housing construction and land use and zoning patterns and trends. The Plan also includes the following additional chapters: Plan Goals Chapter – Goals are the framework for guiding County growth and development. The guidelines of each chapter are based upon the principles of these goals. Where the goals refer to public facilities and infrastructure, they include schools, parks, libraries, fire and emergency medical services stations, transportation and other public infrastructure and services. PUBLIC FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE • Orderly and fiscally-responsible growth occurs by providing adequate public facilities and infrastructure. • Public facilities and infrastructure are provided to ensure efficient, effective and fiscally responsible use of county resources. • The public sector’s role for ensuring long term stability and supporting a high quality of life is to provide equitable distribution and efficient allocation of public resources. Provision of equitable public services will promote investment and reinvestment in aging and maturing areas. COMMUNITY • The mix of public facilities, housing, commercial, industrial, agricultural, recreational and open space uses is balanced to ensure a high quality of life and fiscal health. • A variety of living, shopping, entertainment, recreation and employment opportunities are available. • Strong and sustainable neighborhoods and business areas are well planned, high quality, visually attractive and well maintained. • Redevelopment and infill opportunities are promoted to take advantage of existing or planned public facilities and infrastructure. ECONOMY • A high quality of life is supported by an expanding and diverse economy that generates well paying jobs and contributes significantly to the tax base. • Prime Economic Development Opportunity sites are served by adequate public facilities and infrastructure so as to offer “ready sites” that are competitively attractive for investment. • Economic sites are reserved for development consistent with the Plan and development in proximity to the sites is compatible. • Revitalization and infill economic resources sites are reserved for development consistent with the Plan and development in proximity to the sites is compatible. ENVIRONMENT • Valued environmental resources are protected, and where appropriate enhanced, through fair regulatory practices and regulations while accommodating growth and development consistent with the Plan. • Vital environmental resources and features are integrated into development designs for enjoyment by the community, where appropriate. HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL • Unique historical and cultural resources are valued, preserved, and where appropriate incorporated into the community fabric. • Tourism and educational opportunities are provided to promote unique historical and cultural resources. Economic Development Chapter – This chapter includes a discussion of the business advantages of the County, including location, transportation network, workforce, education and training, the County’s AAA bond rating, enterprise zones, technology zones, tourism zones, defense zones and incentives relating to these zones. It also includes an inventory of prime economic development opportunity sites and recommendation strategies to fulfill the long-range development potential of these sites. Other major considerations addressed in this chapter include: 1) building upon a strong, growing and diverse economy; 2) protecting prime economic development sites; 3) encouraging the equitable distribution of economic resources throughout the county; 4) Striving for a mix of employment industries that generates high-paying jobs; 5) promoting tourism in the county as an economic engine; 6) Promoting unified business attraction and retention strategies. The Economic Development Chapter recommends the following guidelines: ECONOMIC GROWTH: Promote economic development activities that attract, retain and expand commerce at all levels, from home-based businesses to large commercial concerns. • Strategically utilize incentives and financing to support existing businesses and keep them in Chesterfield County, as well to attract new businesses. • Increase the diversity of the county’s economic base by promoting and supporting entrepreneurial and small business opportunities. • Promote business attraction and retention strategies that are complementary to both new and existing business. • Identify and preserve Prime Economic Development Opportunity Sites for regional level growth and encourage the development of these sites for high tax revenue-generating uses. • Identify local areas for employmentgenerating use to ensure new and growing job opportunities are available in communities throughout the county. • Promote the development of planned office centers, business and industrial parks and mixed use centers. • Support the viability, operational efficiency, and productivity of the county’s agricultural resources for current and future generations. • Promote economic development opportunities associated with the expansion of Virginia State University. REVITALIZATION: Achieve Chesterfield County’s vision for quality of life by promoting public and private commitment to enhance, restore and sustain the quality and diversity of the county’s existing business and industrial corridors. • Strategically utilize incentives and financing to support existing businesses and encourage investment in targeted revitalization areas. • Encourage the rehabilitation and reuse of underutilized or vacant properties. • Invest in public facilities and infrastructure that supports economic development efforts in targeted revitalization areas. • Pursue cooperative relationships with community-based, faith-based and nonprofit organizations to enhance economic development in targeted revitalization areas. MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS: Expand the tax base by promoting the county as a premier business location. • Work with regional marketing partners to market the county locally, nationally and internationally. • Market the county’s key economic assets including the airport, road system, utilities, river access; as well as the specific operating advantages of the county’s location in the region. • Promote awareness of the assets and diversity of the county’s individual communities to attract highly-skilled residents and support efforts to maintain the appeal of the county’s communities. • Market the advantages of the resources and partnerships with such higher educational institutions as Virginia State University and John Tyler Community College. INFRASTRUCTURE: Connect economic development opportunity sites and areas to countywide and regional transportation systems, including major thoroughfares, seaports, airports, and railways. • Coordinate the provision of transportation and utility infrastructure in key economic development sites and revitalization areas. • Encourage industrial and commercial development in areas where utility capacity is available or underutilized. • Encourage a range of multi-modal transportation options that link businesses to their labor force, customers and adjacent communities. • Promote key interchanges such as those on I-95, I-295 and Route 288 for office, industrial and commercial development. • Promote the economic development advantages of conventional and high speed rail through the county and develop specific strategies to take advantage of rail services for economic development promotion. • Encourage appropriate development within the Airport Industrial Park and surrounding areas that protects and promotes the use of the Chesterfield County Airport. • Encourage redevelopment of the Ettrick train station. • Encourage expansion of broadband services throughout the county. • Support a county park system that provides high quality recreation opportunities and enhances quality of life and attractiveness to businesses. TOURISM: Promote the county’s unique recreational, natural, cultural and historical resources as tourism assets. • Support tourism development and promotion, including the potential for agritourism such as wineries and farmers’ markets in the county’s rural areas and eco-tourism utilizing the county’s park system and the Appomattox and James Rivers. • Promote private and public funding of arts and cultural programs, recognizing them as positive contributors to tourism efforts and a high quality of life for residents. • Utilize the county’s unique historic, natural and cultural resources, to promote tourism through events and programs that attract visitors from the region, state and beyond. • Support sports tourism through the development and enhancement of public and private recreation-related facilities that attract outside visitors, serve citizens and support local businesses. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY: Recognize the importance of planning for adequate and fiscally responsible funding for infrastructure investments that support business development. • Invest in public facilities and infrastructure that supports economic development efforts. • Use innovative financing structures, such as special assessment districts, to pay for needed public improvements. • Encourage the use of private-public partnerships to improve infrastructure such as Virginia’s Public Private Transportation Act or Community Development Authorities. • Review and amend the Zoning Ordinance to accommodate targeted industries necessary for a strong and diverse economy. • Encourage diverse mixtures and forms of development to support the economic tax base of the county for current and future generations. COLLABORATION: Foster collaboration with federal, state, regional and local agencies and entities to promote mutually beneficial economic development opportunities. • Foster a cooperative relationship between the county government and the business community. • Promote organizational and regulatory changes to streamline the development review process and provide flexibility in development standards while continuing to ensure high quality development so that the county becomes less of a regulator and more of a partner and a facilitator for economic development. • Partner with neighboring localities and regional organizations to promote tourism and economic development in the region. • Pursue cooperative relationships with community-based, faith-based and nonprofit organizations to enhance economic development in the county. • Collaborate closely with the region’s academic institutions such as Virginia State University and John Tyler Community College as partners to leverage assets, provide research opportunities and to develop a workforce aligned with business needs. • Establish a close partnership with the Economic Development Authority to market to and attract high-end and high-tech industries. • Pursue partnerships with Chesterfield County Public Schools to promote the development of workforce skills that respond and adapt to the changing needs of the county’s current and desired future businesses. • Strengthen relationships with elected officials at the local, state and federal levels to promote economic development opportunities. • Collaborate with other county departments such as Libraries and Parks & Recreation to develop programs that support business development. Housing – This chapter includes an overview of the housing situation in the County, including the affordability, age and value of the housing stock. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include: 1) Promoting a variety of affordable housing choices for a range of incomes; 2) promoting development of attractive new neighborhoods; 3) maintaining and revitalizing existing neighborhoods; 4) encouraging use of quality design principles for new housing; and 5) supporting renovation of existing, and construction of new, housing to enhance existing neighborhoods. The Housing Chapter recommends the following guidelines: • Support affordable housing opportunities and choices including incentives for the integration of affordable/workforce housing in market rate developments and architectural compatibility with market rate units. • Support a variety of housing choices such as type, size and style. • Guide high density and special needs housing developments to areas designated on the Land Use Plan Map for COMMUNITY MIXED USE and REGIONAL MIXED USE, and areas in proximity to supporting office and commercial services. • In accordance with the recommendations of The Land Use Plan chapter, promote mixed use developments which are designed to function as a community rather than as individual independent developments. • Encourage new housing developments to incorporate quality design standards for architecture, landscaping and other design features that create unique and attractive places that enhance the community. • Consider additional incentives for housing rehabilitation and reinvestment. • Support and provide incentives for development of new communities and revitalization of existing communities on infill properties. Such development should enhance existing area neighborhoods and be developed in accordance with the recommendations in The Land Use Plan chapter. Revitalization – This chapter addresses revitalization of the County’s neighborhoods and business corridors with a special focus on school parity, community organization and involvement, neighborhood enhancement initiatives, business attraction and retention strategies and proactive code enforcement. Subjects include the role of public facilities and services in revitalization efforts, neighborhood enhancement areas, and Special Focus and Gateway Areas, including challenges and opportunities for the Eastern Midlothian Turnpike, Eastern Route 360 Corridor, Meadowdale/Meadowbrook Area, Northern Jefferson Davis Corridor and Ettrick/Virginia State University areas. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include: • Fair and balanced allocation of public investment between existing and new development through appropriate fiscal tools and policies • Fair and equitable provision of public services and infrastructure • Enhancing the sense of place to support socio-economic well-being • Maintaining and expanding the economic vitality and quality of life • Integrating revitalization efforts into all aspects of community planning, where appropriate. The Revitalization chapter recommends the following guidelines: REVITALIZATON STRATEGY: Develop a revitalization strategy to promote public and private commitments to enhance, restore and maintain the quality and diversity of neighborhoods, and business corridors. These strategies should include: • Developing criteria for designating Neighborhood Enhancement Areas and Special Focus and Gateway Areas • Focusing public and private investment in Neighborhood Enhancement Areas, and Special Focus and Gateway Areas by renovating or replacing declining infrastructure and public facilities; and encouraging new housing and businesses location • Retaining and expanding existing uses and attracting new uses consistent with the recommendations of The Land Use Plan chapter • Coordinating proactive code enforcement to include zoning, building and health codes • Developing standards for maintaining rental property • Evaluating how the county can more effectively and efficiently promote revitalization • Incorporating plans for Neighborhood Enhancement Areas and Special Focus and Gateway Areas into Special Area Plans where appropriate PUBLIC FACILITES: Encourage public facility parity throughout the county by: • Supporting renovation and maintenance of existing facilities, especially schools, in established communities when economically feasible. When not economically feasible, rebuild on, or in proximity to, existing sites • Supporting new infrastructure such as parks and sidewalks in established communities FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY: Support revitalization efforts that maximize benefit from the efficient use of public and private financial resources by: • Supporting investment in public facilities and infrastructure • Identifying funding sources and tools to support revitalization efforts • Promoting private-public partnerships to improve infrastructure. COLLABORATION: Foster collaboration with governmental agencies, community and business associations, property owners, and faith-based and non-profit organizations to promote mutually beneficial revitalization opportunities. DETAILED NEIGHBORHOOD ENHANCEMENT AREAS, AND SPECIAL FOCUS AND GATEWAY AREAS PLANS: Develop detailed plans for these areas which should include: • Identifying community stakeholders • Performing a market and socio-economic analysis • Identifying a vision and goals • Identifying existing conditions to include zoning, development regulations, buildings, uses, vacant properties and potential on-site contaminants • Incorporating gateways to communicate a positive, distinct and attractive identity • Rehabilitating, reusing or replacing public facilities to create a sense of community and encourage new investment • Evaluating transportation to include levels of service and multi-model transportation options; utilities and other public infrastructure • Evaluating environmental features; restoring damaged, impaired and/or degraded environmental features; incorporating, protecting and enhancing environmental features to improve community livability and aesthetics • Providing public improvements necessary to stimulate revitalization • Identifying historic and cultural assets • Identifying incentives that support revitalization and reinvestment • Providing flexible and appropriate design standards specific to area needs that enhance and encourage investment HOUSING: Support housing reinvestment and infill in established communities by: • Identifying funding sources and tools for housing rehabilitation and renovation • Promoting housing maintenance, rehabilitation and renovation through education and proactive code enforcement efforts • Supporting integration of new development into existing communities in accordance with the recommendations in the land use plan chapter where such development would enhance existing neighborhoods • Identifying transportation enhancements to promote the community’s accessibility to employment and services • Promoting redevelopment and new development of supporting community retail uses and services • Supporting the development of a design guide for renovating and rehabilitating older housing stock MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS: Pursue efforts to market Special Focus and Gateway areas as prime business locations. TOURISM: Promote unique recreational, natural, cultural and historical resources in Neighborhood Enhancement and Special Focus and Gateway areas for tourism. Historical & Cultural Resources – This chapter tells the history of the County and identifies major historical and cultural landmarks and resources. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include:1) promoting public awareness of the county’s history; 2) promoting the County’s history to enhance tourism and economic development; 2) supporting voluntary preservation efforts; 3) supporting voluntary preservation efforts; 4)appropriate adaptive reuse of historical structures; 5) integrating preserved areas into developments and 6) protecting unique architectural and design qualities in historic villages. The Historical & Cultural Resources Chapter recommends the following guidelines: • Consider enhancement and expansion of programs, events and other activities that increase public awareness of the county’s historical and cultural resources and their contribution to the region, state and nation. • Promote tourism through marketing the county’s historical and cultural sites. • Encourage voluntary local, state and national historic landmark and district designations though incentive programs. Consider designation of only that area necessary to accomplish preservation thereby affording the option for future use of the remaining area. • Encourage voluntary historic preservation and other easements for preserving important historical and cultural resources. • Encourage preservation, incorporation and integration of historical and cultural resources through design and layout of development projects. Consider development incentives such as reduced parking, setbacks, buffers and other design standards. • Encourage adaptive reuse of countydesignated historic sites and structures in accordance with the recommendations of The Land Use Plan Chapter. • Within historic villages as determined through development of Special Area Plans, consider development standards such as architectural features, landscaping, setbacks and other design measures that enhance the village character. These historic villages could include Bon Air, Chester, Ettrick, Matoaca and Midlothian. • Encourage development of interpretive trails that provide access to historical and cultural resources such as along Civil War earthworks and battlefield sites, Lee’s Retreat route and waterfront areas. • Consider development of special purpose parks that provide public access to historical and cultural sites. • Encourage proper funding for maintenance and preservation of county-owned historical and cultural resources. • Support the provision of cultural amenities such as arts centers, theaters and other similar facilities as a part of mixed use developments, and in other community focal points. Environment – This chapter discusses the County’s land, air and water resources, including geology, topography and soils, mineral resources, forest and farmland, conservation lands, and natural heritage resources. It discusses the impacts of land resources on development infrastructure. It also addresses air quality, noise, light and water resources. It addresses federal, state and local regulatory requirements relating to water quality and the environment. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include:1) acknowledging existing regulations regarding water quality, floodplains and soils; 2) promoting protection of land, surface water and groundwater resources for drinking, aesthetic and recreational purposes; 3) encouraging the incorporation of environmental resources as amenities in new development; and 4) supporting adaptive reuse of land resources formally occupied by activities such as quarries and landfills. The Environment Chapter recommends the following guidelines: • Encourage development designs which accommodate and incorporate environmental resources as amenities. • Encourage innovative approaches, designs and practices that protect and enhance environmental resources in new developments. When the guidelines of The Land Use Plan are followed, approaches could include: reduced lot sizes in return for preservation of open space; connectivity of resources; and appropriate recreational uses that make use of these resources. • Encourage use of innovative development standards and practices that mitigate the impact of stormwater runoff on water quality such as: low impact design features; limitations on the amount of land cleared during site development at any given time; retrofitting best management practices in older neighborhoods; use of manufactured best management practices; use of best management practices in series; development of contingency plans for hazardous spills; preservation of trees and preservation of vegetation in floodplains. • Consider measures to reduce runoff of fertilizers and pesticides pollutants from golf courses such as fertilizer and pest management plans, and directing stormwater to best management practices. • For developments not located within mixed use areas, consider use of environmental features as transitions between different land uses, in accordance with the recommendations of The Land Use Plan. • Encourage greater erosion and sediment control measures during development. • Encourage greater protection, restoration and stabilization of streams and shorelines. • Encourage preservation of slopes of 20 percent or greater adjacent to natural drainageways. • Consider enhancement and expansion of community, school and library outreach programs to educate the public of daily practices that protect and enhance water resources. • Encourage public and private cooperation in the preservation and use of environmental resources such as conservation and open space easements and park and recreational uses. • Seek funding opportunities for acquiring land and resources that benefit the public. • Seek funding to correct environmental deficiencies by retrofitting and establishing stormwater quality facilities. • Energy Conservation: In accordance with The Land Use Plan, promote mixed use developments which incorporate residential and non-residential uses, thereby promoting opportunities for various methods of transportation; encourage incorporation of energy efficiency in construction and rehabilitation that reduces costs for the owner or renter and promote developments that incorporate alternative energy sources such as geothermal, solar and wind. • Support water quality protection measures through the Chesapeake Bay Ordinance, Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System, Erosion and Sediment Control Ordinances and the Upper Swift Creek Watershed regulations. • Provide for the preservation of agricultural and forestry uses by supporting conservation and open space easements, tax incentives and programs such as acquisition of development rights which promote rural preservation and support uses such as agri-tourism, farmer’s markets, wineries, equestrian activities, community gardens and agricultural festivals. • Consider provisions of adequate erosion and sediment controls for timbering activities related to new land development. • Consider the impacts of new mineral extractions and landfill proposals on existing and future land uses • Consider the impacts of existing and former mineral extractions and landfill operations on new development in the vicinity of the operations. • Consider proper and safe closure of sites to mitigate long term impacts. • Discourage residential development in proximity to mineral extractions and landfills. • Discourage new mineral extractions and landfills in proximity to existing and future residential development. • Consider methods to notify future property owners of sites previously used for mineral extractions and landfills of past activities and their potential impacts on future land uses. • Encourage the adaptive reuse of former quarries and landfills. • Promote preservation and enhancement of the scenic, historic, natural and open space qualities of the James and Appomattox Rivers. • Support proposals for waterfront access while considering potential water quality impacts of water dependent uses such as docks, piers, boat ramps and marinas. The Land Use Plan – The purpose of the Land Use Plan is to serve as a guide for zoning, land use and development-related decisions. It does not rezone property or carry regulatory standing. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include:1) selected previously adopted Special Area Plans; 2) existing land use patterns; 3) topography and other physical characteristics; 4) existing residential neighborhood densities and lot sizes; 5) ability to provide public water and wastewater in an orderly manner; 6) existing and future transportation facilities; 7) orderly expansion of other public infrastructure and facilities; 8) protecting current and future county airport operations; 9) providing a range of housing types; 10) providing a range of employment opportunities; 11) providing a range of commercial services; and 12) offering waterfront development opportunities. General Land Use Guidelines - The following General Land Use Guidelines should be used when addressing specific development and land use issues: • Coordinate development proposals with the orderly extension and provision of adequate public facilities and infrastructure. • Protect areas designated for employmentgenerating uses and commercial services from encroachment of residential uses, except in mixed use developments. Encourage development phasing of sites concurrent with the development of adequate roads and other infrastructure necessary to support the recommended intensity and density of development. • Promote land use regulations that are easy to understand and implement by incorporating illustrations, charts and graphics. • Give consideration to unique and innovative development proposals that may not conform to a literal interpretation of the Plan, if the benefits and merits are consistent with the intent of the Plan to achieve a well-designed, integrated and high quality community served by adequate public facilities and infrastructure. • Include land use transitions, site design and buffering in development proposals located outside of mixed use areas to reduce the impacts between incompatible land uses. • Encourage new development designs to accommodate pedestrian and vehicular interconnectivity with similar existing and future developments, provided that existing developments are not adversely impacted. • Encourage new development to incorporate quality design standards for architecture, landscaping and pedestrian ways that create unique and viable places and enhance the community. • Provide flexibility in consideration of zoning amendments when such amendments would bring the zoning and development closer into compliance with the Land Use Plan Map. • Encourage land aggregation and/or master planning in instances where development of an individual parcel is constrained due to its size or shape. This should be considered where necessary to conform to land use regulations, achieve land use compatibility or transition or provide adequate transportation improvements. • Encourage new high density and agetargeted developments to be located in Community and Regional Mixed Use areas, or in proximity to supporting office and commercial services. • Where open space is provided to compensate for reduced lot sizes or accommodate increased intensity, encourage the long-term preservation of such areas • Encourage the preservation of historic sites and structures through their adaptive reuse. Support uses other than those identified on the Land Use Plan Map, provided the uses can be designed and operated to minimize the impact on existing and anticipated area development, and the site or structure is designated as a county historic landmark. • Promote agricultural related activities in these areas by considering the following:

• Uses that support agricultural activities, such as farmer’s markets and agricultural tourism;

• Commercial uses for a limited time period with minimal site improvements, provided the uses can be designed and operated to minimize the impact on existing and anticipated area development; or

• Incentives that encourage continued agricultural activities. The following Land Use Plan Map Categories provide more specific direction for the evaluation of specific proposals, including recommendations concerning the use, or not, of public water and wastewater systems in each category and developmental restrictions related to public water and wastewater facilities. Generally new development in: the Rural Residential/Agricultural area will use individual wells and individual on-site septic systems; in the Residential Agricultural area new subdivision development will use public water and individual on-site septic systems; in the Low Density Residential area new subdivision development will use public water and either public wastewater or individual onsite septic systems; in all other categories, new development will generally utilize the public water and wastewater systems. RURAL RESIDENTIAL/AGRICULTURAL (Equivalent Zoning: A). In an Agricultural (A) District, the following uses are appropriate: • Single family dwellings on a minimum of 5 acres fronting 250 to 300 feet along existing public roads; • Single family dwellings on a minimum of 1 acre created through family divisions. • Single family dwellings on less than 5 acres in instances where the parcel was created prior to the adoption of the 5 acre requirement; and • Farming. RESIDENTIAL AGRICULTURAL - Density: Maximum of 0.5 dwellings per acre (Equivalent Zoning: A; R-88 Updated; R-C Updated; New R-A Category).A combination of agricultural and residential uses is appropriate in this category. In an Agricultural (A) District, the following uses are appropriate: • Single family dwellings on a minimum of 5 acres fronting 250 to 300 feet along an existing public road; • Single family dwellings on a minimum of 1 acre created through family divisions; and • Single family dwellings on less than 5 acres in instances where the parcel was created prior to the adoption of the 5 acre requirement; and • Farming. In Residential (R) Districts, the following uses are appropriate: • Single family dwellings on large lots in developments that preserve the rural/forested character along arterial roads and in some instances along collector roads: • Small-scale farming ; • Subdivisions with lots of 2.0 acres; and • Subdivisions with lots smaller than 2.0 acres if usable open space is provided to maintain the overall density recommendations. Such open space should preserve rural vistas such as ponds, pastures and wooded areas, while providing passive recreational areas (i.e. walking and riding trails). LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL - Density: Maximum of 1.0 dwelling per acre (Equivalent Zoning: R-40; New R Categories). The following uses are appropriate: • Single family dwellings on lots of approximately 1 acre; and • Single family dwellings on lots smaller than 1 acre if usable open space is provided to maintain the overall density recommendations within the Low Density Residential area; and primary access is directly to a major roadway and not through an existing residential development having larger lots than the proposed development. PHASED SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL - Density: Maximum of 2.0 dwellings per acre (Equivalent Zoning: R-25; R-15; R-12; New R Categories).The following uses are appropriate until such time as public utilities and other public facilities are available, as described herein: • Single family dwellings on a minimum of 5 acres fronting 250 to 300 feet along and existing public road; • Single family dwellings on a minimum of 1 acre created through family divisions; and • Single family dwellings on less than 5 acres in instances where the parcel was created prior to the adoption of the 5 acre requirement. SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL I - Density: Maximum of 2.0 dwellings per acre (Equivalent Zoning: R-25; R-15; R-12; New R Categories). The following uses are appropriate: • Single family dwellings on lots ranging between 12,000 and 25,000 square feet; and

• Dwellings on smaller lots or condominiums under the following circumstances:

Development design and quality complements and enhances the surrounding residential area;

• Water quality protection is provided for the swift creek reservoir;

• Primary access is directly to a major roadway and not through an existing residential development having an average lot size than that proposed by the development;

• Compensating usable open space maintains the overall density recommendations; and

• Quality design standards which could include the provision of sidewalks, street trees, site and individual lot landscaping, quality and variety of architectural design, garage orientation and hardscaped driveways. SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL II - Density: 2.0 to 4.0 dwellings per acre (Equivalent Zoning: R-25; R-15; R-12; New R Categories). The following uses are appropriate: • Single family dwellings on lots ranging between 12,000 and 25,000 square feet; and • Dwellings on smaller lots or condominiums under the following circumstances:

• Development design and quality complements and enhances the surrounding residential area;

• Primary access is directly to a major roadway and not through an existing residential development having an average lot size than that proposed by the development;

• Compensating usable open space maintains the overall density recommendations; and

• Quality development standards which could include the provision of sidewalks, street trees, site and individual lot landscaping, quality and variety of architectural design, garage orientation and hardscaped driveways. MEDIUM-HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL - Density: Minimum 4.0 to 8.0 dwellings per acre (Equivalent Zoning: R-7 Updated; R-9 Updated; R-TH Updated; R-MF Updated; New R Categories). The following uses are appropriate: • Various residential types including, but not limited to, single family, two-family, zero lot line, townhouse, condominium and multifamily dwellings. Projects should be developed at the minimum densities suggested for this land use category. HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL - Density: Minimum 8.0 to 12.0 dwellings per acre ( Equivalent Zoning: R-TH Updated; R-MF Updated; New R Categories). The following uses are appropriate: • Various residential types including, but not limited to, townhouse, condominium and multifamily dwellings. Projects should be developed at the minimum densities suggested for this land use category. NEIGHBORHOOD OFFICE (Not all potential sites identified on Land Use Plan Map)- Equivalent Zoning: O-1; O-2 Limited). The following uses are appropriate: • Professional and administrative offices or similar uses. Typical uses could include doctor’s, lawyer’s, accountant’s and real estate offices. CORPORATE OFFICE (Equivalent Zoning: O-2). The following uses are appropriate: • Professional and administrative offices or similar uses. Typical uses could include corporate headquarters, lawyer’s, accountant’s and real estate offices; medical laboratories; and colleges. The size of individual offices is typically larger than that found in a Neighborhood Office area; and • Under certain circumstances, within larger tracts developed for office uses, integrated supporting retail and service uses. CONVENIENCE BUSINESS (Not all potential sites identified on Land Use Plan Map) (Equivalent Zoning: C-1). The following uses are appropriate: • Limited retail and personal services located near residential neighborhoods; in areas shown on the Land Use Plan for Rural Residential/Agricultural and Residential Agricultural; or within new subdivisions. Uses should be limited to those that attract customers residing in proximity to the area. Typical uses could include convenience stores, drug stores, restaurants or other uses that primarily serve residents’ daily needs. NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS (Equivalent Zoning: C-2). The following uses are appropriate: • Commercial uses that serve neighborhoodwide trade areas. Such uses generally attract customers residing in neighborhoods within a small geographical area. The size of individual stores is typically larger than that found in a Convenience Business area; and uses are located completely within an enclosed building. Typical uses could include grocery stores, clothing stores, medical clinics, hardware stores, restaurants or other uses that primarily serve weekly or bi-weekly household needs. COMMUNITY BUSINESS (Equivalent Zoning: C-3). The following uses are appropriate: • Commercial uses that serve communitywide trade areas. Such uses generally attract customers living or working within an approximate radius of 10 miles. Typical uses could include large grocery stores, department stores, home centers, limited repair services or other uses that provide goods and services that are purchased on a less frequent basis than those uses in Convenience or Neighborhood Business areas. Limited outside storage and display may occur as accessory to the primary uses. COMMUNITY MIXED USE (Equivalent Zoning: New C-3 Mixed Use Category; TND Updated). The following uses are appropriate: • Integrated mixture of concentrated commercial and higher density residential uses with public spaces, located on tracts having sufficient size to accommodate such mixtures. The majority of uses within these developments should be commercial and office. Residential uses should be developed in conjunction with the non-residential uses. The residential component of each project should be developed at, or exceeding, the maximum densities suggested for the High Density Residential areas. These mixed use areas are generally located at the intersection of arterial roads.

• Commercial uses are those that serve community-wide trade areas. Such uses generally attract customers living or working within an approximate radius of 10 miles. Typical uses could include large grocery stores, department stores, home centers, limited repair services or other uses that provide goods and services that are purchased on a less frequent basis than those uses in Convenience or

Neighborhood Business areas. Limited outside storage and display may occur as accessory to the primary uses.

• Higher density residential uses should be located within these mixed uses areas, but should not be the predominate use. These uses could be incorporated vertically (on the upper floors of a building occupied by non-residential uses on lower floors) or horizontally (within separate buildings from the non-residential uses). GENERAL BUSINESS (Equivalent Zoning: C-5; I-1). The following uses are appropriate: • Intense commercial uses which normally have outside display and storage areas. Typical commercial uses could include motor vehicle related uses, contractor’s shops and storage yards, manufactured home sales, truck terminals, repair services or other uses that serve customers’ specialized needs; and • Light industrial/research and development uses. Typical uses could include various types of laboratories; offices; warehousing; and optical goods, cosmetic, jewelry, musical instruments and artist materials manufacturing REGIONAL MIXED USE (Equivalent Zoning: C-4 Updated). The following uses are appropriate: • Integrated mixture of highly concentrated corporate office, commercial, light industrial/ research and development, and higher density residential uses with public spaces, located on large tracts of land generally at the interchange of arterials and limited access roads. While the uses permitted are generally similar to those recommended within Community Mixed Use areas, Regional Mixed Use areas are generally larger, more densely and intensely developed with structured parking and often occupied by uses having a regional customer draw. The majority of uses within these developments should be commercial, office, research and development, and light industrial uses. Residential uses should be developed in conjunction with the non-residential uses. The residential component of each project should be developed at, or exceeding, the maximum densities suggested for the High Density Residential areas.

• Commercial uses which generally attract customers living or working within an approximate radius of 20 miles or more.

Typical uses could include those found in Community Business areas such as grocery stores, department stores, home centers, limited repair services or other uses that provide goods and services that are purchased on a less frequent basis than those provided in other commercial areas.

Uses tend to be of a much larger scale than those in other commercial areas. Limited outside storage and display may occur as accessory to the primary uses;

• Corporate Office/Research and

Development/Light Industrial uses which provide for major regional employment opportunities; and

• Higher density residential uses should be located within these mixed use areas, but not be the predominate use. These uses could be incorporated vertically (on the upper floors of a building occupied by non-residential uses on lower floors) or horizontally (within separate buildings from the non-residential uses). CORPORATE OFFICE/RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT/LIGHT INDUSTRIAL (Equivalent Zoning: O-2; I-1; I-2 Limited). The following uses are appropriate: • Corporate office, research, laboratories, and light manufacturing and assembly uses that are generally dependent upon raw materials first processed elsewhere. The uses are located completely within an enclosed building. Typical uses could include corporate headquarter offices and various types of laboratories; warehousing; and optical goods, cosmetic, jewelry, musical instruments and artist materials manufacturing. (Equivalent zoning categories O-2 and I-1); • Moderate industrial uses when designed, located and/or oriented to ensure compatibility with less intense uses; and are of a nature that has a similar impact as light manufacturing/research and development uses. Typical uses could include furniture, noodle, dairy and sign manufacturing. (Equivalent zoning category I-2); and • Under certain circumstances, within larger tracts developed for industrial uses, integrated supporting retail and service uses. INDUSTRIAL (Equivalent Zoning: I-2; I-3). The following uses are appropriate: • Moderate to intense manufacturing uses that are generally dependent upon the processing of raw materials, and uses normally have associated outside storage areas. Typical uses could include paint, tobacco products, paper, rubber, plastic and cement manufacturing; truck terminals; and boat repair; and • Under certain circumstances, within larger tracts developed for industrial uses, integrated supporting retail and service uses. CONSERVATION/RECREATION (Equivalent Zoning: All zoning districts) • As of the date of the Land Use Plan Map, federal, state and county parklands, and privately owned land held in voluntary public or private trust for the purpose of preserving or promoting its natural function, character or historic significance. AREA NOTES • Chesterfield County Airport Operational and Runway Approach Areas - To optimize economic development opportunities, the Land Use Plan Map discourages new residential development in these areas. • Specific Master Planned/Land Aggregation Areas - Land uses in these areas should be achieved through aggregation and/or master planning. • Ettrick/Virginia State University (VSU) Study Area – The plan recognizes the Ettrick/ VSU area as an area requiring future detailed planning efforts, including analysis of the potential of increased rail service. • Historic Courthouse Design Area - Future non-residential development should incorporate similar Federalist and Colonial architectural design features. SITE SPECIFIC NOTES • Note 1: Route 60/Huguenot Springs Road - Development should be compatible with the historic structures of Bethel Baptist Church and Hallsborough Tavern. • Note 2: Powhite Parkway Extended Interchanges and Route 288/Qualla Road Interchange – A portion of these areas should be reserved and developed for regional mixed uses. • Note 3: Chippenham Parkway/Route 10 - Land uses other than those shown may be appropriate if adequate land is assembled to minimize the impact on surrounding land uses. • Note 4: Route 288/Route 360 – If mitigating road improvements cannot be achieved, less intensive land uses would be appropriate. • Note 5: East/West Freeway Interchanges - Regional Mixed Use would be appropriate around these interchanges in conjunction with construction of the East/West Freeway. • Waterfront Opportunity Sites (Not All Potential Sites Identified on the Land Use Plan Map) - Opportunity sites for alternative land uses to those recommended by the Land Use Plan Map that would capitalize upon their proximity to water and associated water amenities. Special Area Plans – This chapter provides that the following previously adopted Special Area Plans are incorporated by reference into the Plan and will remain in effect until changed by the Board of Supervisors: Jahnke/ Chippenham Development Area Plan, Bon Air Community Plan, (Northern) Jefferson Davis Corridor Plan, (Eastern) Route 360 Corridor Plan, Eastern Midlothian Plan, Midlothian Area Community Plan, Chester Plan and Northern Courthouse Road Community Plan. The Special Area Plans chapter recommends the following guidelines: 1) In the Implementation chapter, establish a procedure for prioritizing the sequence of review of Special Area Plans along with the Ettrick/Virginia State University (VSU) Study Area and other specifically identified implementation measures, 2) Consider development of other Special Area Plans for communities having unique characteristics or challenges; and Where appropriate, consider combining special area planning efforts with revitalization and economic efforts, as identified in the Revitalization and Economic Development Chapters. Water & Wastewater - The Water & Wastewater chapter provides guidance and direction for meeting the county’s water and wastewater needs based upon the growth and development anticipated by The Land Use Plan. It identifies the sources of the County’s water, addresses planning for future water demand, discusses water reclamation and reuse, addresses the County’s public wastewater treatment facilities and planning for future wastewater services, discusses existing regulations for public water and wastewater including mandatory utility connections, utility extensions, and special districts, and addresses private water and wastewater issues including individual onsite wells, individual on-site wastewater systems and privately owned/operated community water and wastewater treatment facilities. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include: 1) acknowledging the guidelines of The Land Use chapter relative to the use of public systems; 2) acknowledging existing regulations regarding protection of water quality and the impact of those regulations on wastewater treatment; 3) supporting the guidelines of the Environment chapter relative to the protection of water quality; 4) continuing operational practices that contribute to the Department of Utilities Department’s financial stability and an AAA bond rating from the top three credit rating services. The Water & Wastewater Chapter recommends the following guidelines: • Support development that is consistent with The Land Use Plan chapter with respect to use of the public water and wastewater systems. • Discourage development that is inconsistent with The Land Use Plan chapter relative to use of the public water and wastewater systems and could place a strain on the public utilities systems. • Consider the impacts of developments proposing to extend water and wastewater systems through undeveloped areas potentially spurring growth and development inconsistent with the recommendations of The Land Use Plan chapter. • Consider revising codes relative to mandatory connection requirements in accordance with the recommendations of The Land Use Plan chapter. • Consider the impacts of decisions on the financial stability of the public water and wastewater systems. • Seek sources of funding to address utility infrastructure needs for Economic Development Opportunity Sites, Enterprise Zones and Targeted Revitalization Areas, identified in the Economic Development and Revitalization chapters. • Continue to require the private sector to bear the cost of public water and wastewater infrastructure to serve new developments. • Support efforts to continue to protect the quality of the county’s drinking water sources, as outlined in the Environment chapter. • Encourage continued regional cooperation in providing public water and wastewater infrastructure and acquiring additional capacity necessary to meet future growth and development needs. • Evaluate measures recommended by the Regional Water Plan to insure adequate water supply and implement, as appropriate. • Promote opportunities for industries in the vicinity of the wastewater treatment plants to partner with the county to use treated reclaimed water. • Provide incentives to reduce irrigation usage. • Consider enhancement and expansion of community, school and library outreach programs to educate the public on water conservation practices such as use of irrigation, rain barrels and drought tolerant landscaping. Transportation - The Transportation Chapter provides general guidance for transportation decisions and for accommodating growth and development as indicated in The Land Use Plan, improving safety, efficiency and accessibility countywide. The chapter addresses roads (especially the County’s Thoroughfare Plan, a map included in this public notice), level of service considerations, funding sources, alternative modes of transportation such as bus services, carpools and rail service, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, airports, and water ports. Major considerations addressed in this chapter include: 1) a safe, efficient and cost effective transportation system, 2) a transportation system that supports existing and future development patterns, 3) multimodal transportation and mobility needs for people and commerce, 4) bicycle and pedestrian accommodations in the planning and design of road improvements where appropriate, and 5) acquiring rights of way to accommodate travel demands including future multimodal transportation infrastructure. The Transportation Chapter recommends the following guidelines: • Seek any and all funding opportunities for planning, coordinating and implementing a comprehensive transportation system. • Monitor levels of service relative to traffic congestion changes to assist in identifying and prioritizing needed road improvements. • Support development proposals that:

• Manage density and land uses based upon more detailed studies than those done for the Comprehensive Plan. Such proposals should provide for mitigating road improvements that adequately address the traffic impact of the proposed development.

• Provide for road improvements and right of way dedications in conformance with the Thoroughfare Plan.

• Demonstrate that an acceptable level of service will be achieved with the provision of agreed upon and committed road improvements.

• Limit the number of direct accesses and proposed road intersections along major arterial and collector roads.

• Provide access management that meet or exceed VDOT guidelines, and emphasize appropriate local access while balancing traffic safety and road capacity.

• Achieve development integration in accordance with The Land Use Plan

Chapter to improve local traffic movements and pedestrian accessibility.

• Encourage new developments to provide bikeways, sidewalks and other pedestrian facilities where appropriate.

• Encourage Park-and-Ride lots at appropriate locations that maximize their use.

• Encourage context sensitive designs in areas designated on The Land Use Plan for compact development or mixed uses. • Explore transit options to meet community and commerce needs. • Explore expanding transit to serve those with special needs. • Support bus and rail service, as needed, in mixed use areas identified on The Land Use Plan Map. • Support commuter and light rail services to include the Ettrick station and potential stations such as Jahnke/Chippenham, Midlothian Village, Watkins Centre Parkway and Old Hundred Road/Midlothian Turnpike areas. • Support expansion of the Ettrick train station to accommodate the anticipated increase in passenger services, and the growth and revitalization of the Ettrick/Virginia State University area. • Consider proactive detailed transportation planning and funding sources for “Prime Economic Development Sites” identified in the Economic Development Chapter. • Consider detailed transportation planning in conjunction with the development of Special Area Plans. • Consider provision of sidewalks in planning and designing major road improvements. • Support the provision of sidewalks in residential and mixed use areas. • Support the provision of sidewalks that connect to schools, parks, retail centers, other community facilities and the linear park/trails system identified in the Public Facilities Plan Chapter. • Consider development of a new bicycle plan. • Use the Bikeway Plan for guidance in review of new development proposals and public road projects. • Consider flexible development standards in areas where separation of bicycle lanes from vehicular travel lanes is desired so as to minimize the impact on private development. • Support bicycle routes which connect to the Linear Parks and Trails system identified in the Public Facilities Plan chapter. The Public Facilities Plan-The Public Facilities Plan identifies current public facilities and makes recommendations regarding the provision of public facilities needed to serve existing and planned population growth through the efficient, equitable, safe and accessible delivery of public services in accordance with the recommendations of the comprehensive plan and identified levels of service. The following General Public Facilities Guidelines should be used when addressing the provision of new public facilities and related land use issues: • Co-locate public facilities wherever possible and appropriate. Co-locate utility improvements such as, but not limited to, pump stations, water towers, etc., with public facility sites. • Support funding priorities that properly maintain existing facilities. Facility condition should be analyzed on a regular basis in support of a systematic, ongoing, preventative maintenance program. • Incorporate green building design and other energy-efficient practices in the construction, renovation and operation of public facilities. Encourage facilities could to be designed to reduce energy needs, water consumption, waste and stormwater runoff. • Acquire public facility sites in advance of, and/or in conjunction with, development using sound real estate principles and practices and in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and policies. Consider the impacts of new facilities in relation to growth as identified in The Land Use Plan. Construction of new facilities should take place in areas contiguous to existing developed areas. • Incorporate and link appropriate public facilities through sidewalks, trails and other similar accommodations. • Base facility site requirements on the concept of “buildable land”. This calculation excludes required buffers, setbacks and other development restrictions, as well as areas with steep slopes, wetlands, RPAs, stormwater ponds and other physical constraints to the use of the property. • Facilities should be located where the road network is safe and adequate, or the roads are improved in conjunction with development or renovation of the facility. Other transportation improvements, such as traffic signals and turn lanes, may also be needed. • Public facilities should be connected to the public water and wastewater systems. • Provide information on the impacts on public facilities of specific development proposals during the zoning process. • Consideration for public facilities outside of the recommendations of this document should be made in conjunction with amendments to this Plan. • Public facility provision and improvement decisions should be based upon documented and objective assessments of need, demand, capacities, fiscal responsibility and the recommendations of the comprehensive plan. • Support parity in the quality, capabilities, and provision of public facilities throughout the county. • Use public facility provision, parity and similar investments as one aspect of an overall approach to revitalizing communities. Support renovations to existing facilities in established communities that facilitate parity. These public investments into established communities should be used to spur private investment in these areas as well. When existing facilities reach a condition where it is more economically feasible to replace the facility rather than renovate it, these new facilities should be rebuilt on, or as close to as possible, the existing site to maintain service to the community, unless a new site would provide improved services. Fire & Emergency Medical Services Recommended Level of Service Standard • Urban Zone. Fire Response: Fire/EMS facilities should be strategically located to provide 4 minutes or less travel time for the first arriving engine company at a fire suppression incident, and 8 minutes or less travel time for deployment of an Effective Firefighting Force (first alarm assignment) at a fire suppression incident. EMS Response: Fire/EMS facilities should be strategically located to provide 4 minutes or less travel time for the first responding unit equipped with an Automatic External Defibrillator or higher level capabilities at an emergency medical incident. • Rural Zone. Fire Response: Fire/EMS facilities should be strategically located to provide 9 minutes or less travel time for the first arriving engine company at a fire suppression incident, and 13 minutes or less travel time for deployment of an Effective Firefighting Force (first alarm assignment) at a fire suppression incident. EMS Response: Fire/EMS facilities should be strategically located to provide 9 minutes or less travel time for the first responding unit equipped with an Automatic External Defibrillator or higher level capabilities at an emergency medical incident. Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Harrowgate Road: new facility in the vicinity of Harrowgate Road and Jefferson Davis Highway. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. (2004 Bond Referendum) • Courthouse/Route 288: new facility in the vicinity of Courthouse Road and Route 288. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. (2004 Bond Referendum) • Replace Matoaca Station: current station is not adequate to the service demands and physical requirements of a professional station. Locate new station in the vicinity of Matoaca Road and Hickory Road. • Replace Midlothian Station: current station is not adequate to the service demands and physical requirements of a professional station. Locate new station in the vicinity of Midlothian Turnpike and Winterfield Road. • North Woodlake: new facility in the vicinity of Otterdale Road and Woolridge Road. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. 2018-2022 • Salem Church: new facility in the vicinity of Salem Church Road and Centralia Road. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. • Replace Ettrick Station: current station is not adequate to the service demands and physical requirements of a professional station. Locate new station in same general area. • Highlands: new facility in the vicinity of Nash Road and Woodpecker Road. Addresses coverage gap. • Revitalize/Replace Chester Station: current station is not adequate to the service demands and physical requirements of a professional station. Locate new station in same general area. Post 2022 • Lucks Lane: new facility in the vicinity of Lucks Lane and Walton Bluff Parkway. Addresses coverage gap. • North Salisbury: new facility in the vicinity of Winterfield Road and Salisbury Drive. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. • Hopkins/Kingsland: new facility in the vicinity of Hopkins Road and Kingsland Road. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. • Roseland: new facility in the vicinity of Old Hundred Road and Brightwalton Road. Addresses coverage gap and demand issues. Recommended Road Improvements: Manchester Station-construct a fire service road from the rear of Manchester Station to Walmsley Blvd., or extend Pocoshock Blvd. from its current terminus to Walmsley Blvd. to improve station response area. Airport Station-construct a fire service or public road from the end of Airfield Drive to Cogbill Road to improve station response area. Police Services Recommended Level of Service Standard • Provide district police stations that are centrally-located to high-call areas and that meet the needs of increased patrol requirements. • Maintain an average response time of 3 minutes or less for priority one calls for service. Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Western Hull Street District Station: currently located in temporary space, this station should be located on Hull Street Road between Otterdale Road and Woodlake Village Parkway. • Relocate Midlothian District Station: currently located in a low-visibility area not central to patrol needs. This station should be relocated further west to the vicinity of Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Road to be more central to the patrol area. • Relocate Chester District Station: currently located in area not central to patrol needs. This station should be relocated further north to the vicinity of Route 1 and Beulah Road to be more central to the patrol area. • Special Operations & Tactical Equipment Storage: acquire property close to Police Headquarters (in the vicinity of Iron Bridge Road and Route 288) to store specialized equipment and specialized tactical vehicles. • Special Operations Facility: construct a facility to house special operations units. This facility should be close to Police Headquarters (in the vicinity of Iron Bridge Road and Route 288). 2018-2022 • Enon District Station: construct new facility in the vicinity of I-295 and Route 10 to address coverage and service gaps that result from community growth and development. Post 2022 • Matoaca District Station: construct new facility in the vicinity of Woodpecker and Matoaca Roads to address coverage and service gaps that result from community growth and development. Sheriff’s Office Services Recommended Level of Service Standard • Maintain a minimum jail rated capacity of 250 beds, or up to a level authorized by the Virginia Department of Corrections. • Maintain the Virginia State Standard for detention cells at 70 square feet per person for the first inmate (single occupancy) and 45 square feet for each additional inmate in a cell. Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Monitor jail capacity trends. 2018-2022 • Begin planning studies to determine how to best manage projected inmate population growth through either expanded use of the local jail or agreements with other regional jail facilities. Coordinate with the Virginia Department of Corrections and regional jail providers to increase local and/or regional jail capacity as necessary and appropriate. Post 2022 • Evaluate results of planning studies and take appropriate actions. Libraries Recommended Level of Service Standard • Provide 0.82 square feet of library floor area per capita in accordance with Library of Virginia standards. • Provide library services within a 10 minute drive time of the non rural population. • Provide 3 items per capita. Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Reams-Gordon Branch: vicinity of Smoketree Drive and Courthouse Road, site has been acquired. Construct a 20,000 square foot facility. Addresses demand issues on the La Prade, Clover Hill, Bon Air and Midlothian branches. (2004 Bond Referendum) • Western Hull Street Branch: vicinity of Otterdale Road and Hull Street Road. Construct a 20,000 square foot facility. Addresses service gap and demand issues related to increases in population anticipated in this area of the county. • Robious Branch: vicinity of Robious Road and Twin Team Lane, site has been dedicated. Construct a 20,000 square foot facility. Addresses demand issues on the Bon Air and Midlothian branches. (2004 Bond Referendum) • Genito-Otterdale Branch: vicinity of Genito and Otterdale Roads. Construct a 20,000 square foot facility. Addresses service gap and demand issues related to increases in population anticipated in this area of the county. • Expand/Replace Ettrick-Matoaca Branch: replace existing facility with a 20,000 square foot facility at or near current site. Addresses service gap and demand issues related to increases in population anticipated in this area of the county. 2018-2022 • Expand/Replace Clover Hill Branch: expand the current facility to 20,000 square feet or replace with new facility at or near current site. • Expand/Replace Enon Branch: expand the current facility to 20,000 square feet or replace with new facility at or near current site. Addresses demand issues related to increases in population anticipated in this area of the county. • Expand/Replace Midlothian Branch: expand the current facility to 20,000 square feet or replace with new facility at or near current site. Post 2022 • Kingsdale-Hopkins Branch: vicinity of Kingsdale, Chester and Hopkins Roads. Construct a 20,000 square foot facility. Addresses demand issues on the Chester branch. • Central Library Expansion: finish 6,000 square feet of shell space within existing facility. Increases functionality of main library. Other • Community Arts Center: vicinity of West Hundred Road and Centre Street. Public-private partnership effort, timing of construction will be determined in conjunction with achieving private funding levels. (2004 Bond Referendum) Public Schools Overall System Recommendations • Provide more community-oriented schools that act as neighborhood anchors and support community use of the facilities after school hours. • Coordinate rehabilitation and new school construction in concert with economic development and revitalization activities. • Adequately maintain all facilities including schools, administrative buildings, auxiliary spaces, sports fields, playgrounds and other school division spaces. • Revitalization is a full modernization of the facility which includes extensive renovation to bring the building up to current codes and standards, while enhancing the overall learning environment. • Replacement entails building a new school facility either on the same site (preferred) or at a new location within existing attendance boundaries. • Assess facility needs on the basis of current conditions and enrollment as well as projections of future growth and enrollment. • Provide modular classroom buildings to temporarily address insufficient student capacity and/or instructional programs such as special needs. • When appropriate, school facilities should be co-located with other public facilities for maximum efficiency. Flexibility to site acreage will be provided when considering co-location. • Continue to encourage and expand jointuse agreements between school and county agencies for use of school facilities and grounds. • Encourage private sector cooperation in the acquisition and siting of new school facilities through the acceptance of developer proffers of buildable land suitable for school locations in conjunction with review of development proposals, provided the proffered land has been evaluated through the site selection process. • Ensure compatibility of land uses adjacent to existing schools and reserved school sites. • Improve student access and safety by coordinating the construction of roads, sidewalks, bike paths and/or pedestrian trails to and from schools. Extend this linkage to other nearby public facilities such as parks, libraries and community centers. • When possible, consider using multi-story building configurations for new construction and additions to middle schools and high schools to reduce site requirements. Facility Recommendations Note: The timing of school facility recommendations will be added as soon as they are available from schools administration Elementary Schools • Revitalize or replace: Bensley, Beulah and Hopkins • Revitalize or replace Chalkley and Hening • Revitalize or replace Davis • New elementary school facility in the vicinity of Old Hundred and Otterdale Roads, north of Genito Road and south of Midlothian Turnpike. Revitalize or replace Bon Air and Crestwood. • New Elementary school facility in the vicinity of Hull Street and Otterdale Roads, east of Skinquarter Road and south of Duval Road. Revitalize or replace Grange Hall and Swift Creek. • Revitalize or replace Ettrick and Matoaca. • New facility in the vicinity of Ruffin Mill Road / Enon Church Road/Ramblewood Drive. • Revitalize or replace Enon, Harrowgate and Wells. Middle Schools • Western Route 360: in the vicinity of Hull Street and Otterdale Roads. • Chester: in the vicinity of Chester Road and West Hundred Road. • Falling Creek: revitalize or replace • Manchester: revitalize or replace • Matoaca East: revitalize or replace • Matoaca West: revitalize or replace • Providence: revitalize or replace • Swift Creek: revitalize or replace High Schools • Branders Bridge Road: in the vicinity of Branders Bridge, Bradley Bridge and Iron Bridge Roads north of Swift Creek. • Genito/Otterdale Road: in the vicinity of Genito and Otterdale Roads northwest of the Swift Creek Reservoir. • Chester Road/Route 288: in the vicinity of Chester Road and Route 288 north of Route 10. • Monacan: revitalize or replace Career And Technical Education • Old Clover Hill High School: revitalize for a career and technical education facility. • Long term, as commercial growth and development continues in this area, reexamine the use to consider whether continued public use or alternative uses would be appropriate. Should it be determined in the future that alternative uses are appropriate, explore options to sell a portion of the property for private use(s) that would be compatible with continued public use of the athletic fields and the best management practice teaching facility. Additional Technical Center Opportunity • This facility should be located in the vicinity of Chippenham Parkway and Hull Street Road to complement revitalization efforts in the area. Alternative School Settings • Community High School: revitalize or replace Administrative Space • Consolidate administrative operations at the Fulghum Center and the Instructional Development Center at Old Clover Hill High School.

• Long term, as commercial growth and development continues in this area, reexamine the use to consider whether continued public use or alternative uses would be appropriate. Should it be determined in the future that alternative uses are appropriate, explore options to sell a portion of the property for private use(s) that would be compatible with continued public use of the athletic fields and the best management practice teaching facility. Parks and Recreation Systemwide Recommendations • The Parks and Recreation Master Plan should be updated to reflect and provide further guidance to the general recommendations outlined in the Public Facilities Plan. • Where buffers are needed, acquire land adjacent to existing park facilities. • Where appropriate expand existing park sites to meet level of service standards and functional requirements. • A system of linear parks and trails should be promoted to provide non-motorized recreational opportunities. • Maintain high quality and accessible park facilities for users of all ages. • Improve access to the county’s blueways by acquiring easements and properties along major waterways. • Promote the park system as an educational resource for healthy lifestyles, and natural, cultural, historical and environmental awareness. • Parklands should generally be acquired at least 5 years prior to the expected opening of the phase one park facility. Parkland acquisition and facility development may occur prior to recommended facility timing. • To the greatest extent practicable, parks should be co-located with compatible public facilities according to park type and should be in close proximity to residential areas. Special purpose parks are well suited to be located with other park types, and combination facilities are encouraged where appropriate. Regional Park Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Winterpock Area: in the vicinity of Hull Street, Winterpock and Beach Roads. Park should contain approximately 200 acres. 2018-2022 • Western Midlothian Area: in the vicinity of Route 288 north of Powhite Parkway and south of Midlothian Turnpike, if sufficient acreage not found, at least two Community Parks could be substituted. Park should contain approximately 225 acres. Post 2022 • Eastern Matoaca Area: between River and Woodpecker Roads east of Nash Road. Park should contain approximately 175 acres. Community Park Facility Recommendations 2018-2022 • 2 Parks, Midlothian Area: in the area bounded by Old Hundred Road, the county boundary, and Hull Street Road. (180 acres) Note: one Regional Park could be substituted for these park facilities • 1 Park, Dale Area: in the area bounded by Hull Street Road, Route 288, CSX Railroad, and county boundary. (90 acres) • 1 Park, Enon Area: in the area east of I-95 and south of Dutch Gap. (35 acres) Post 2022 • 4 Parks, Midlothian Area: in the area bounded by Old Hundred Road, the county boundary, and Hull Street Road. (360 acres) • 1 Park, Branders Bridge Area: in the vicinity of Branders Bridge and Bradley Bridge Roads north of Woodpecker Road. (35 acres) • 1 Park, Dale Area: in the area bounded by Hull Street Road, Route 288, CSX Railroad and county boundary. (90 acres) Neighborhood Park Facility Recommendations • Countywide: This park category should be used to supplement regional and community parks in specific geographies where there is insufficient regional, community and neighborhood park acreage. In these areas, development proposals, where appropriate, should include neighborhood park sites to serve the development’s park need. 2013-2017 • Cogbill Road Park: in the vicinity of Cogbill Road west of Route 10 and east of Belmont Road, part of the Cogbill Conservation Area. (20 acres) 2018-2022 • Western Hull Street Road: in the area north of Hull Street Road, south of Duval Road and west of Otterdale Road. (20 acres) Post 2022 • Duval Road: in the area north of Duval Road west of Otterdale Road, and generally south of Horsepen Creek. (20 acres) • Mt. Hermon Road: in the vicinity of Mt. Hermon Road and Old Hundred Road south of Midlothian Turnpike. (20 acres) Urban Park Facility Recommendations • Urban parks should be considered in high intensity areas where sufficient park acreage is difficult to acquire. These areas are designated as Regional Mixed Use and Community Mixed Use on the Land Use Plan Map. Urban parks can also be developed as hardscaped plazas, open space, spaces between buildings, and buffer areas. Urban parks should not be considered a replacement for large park types, but rather complement and provide linkages to the County’s park and open space network. These parks may also be used to satisfy open space requirements in high intensity developments. Special Purpose Park Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Appomattox River Canoe Launch: in the vicinity of western River Road 2018-2022 • Appomattox River Canoe Launch: in the vicinity of western Hull Street Road • James River Boating Access: sites along the entire river frontage Post 2022 • Western Lake Chesdin Boating Access: in the vicinity of the western part of Lake Chesdin Linear Parks and Trails Facility Recommendations 2013-2017 • Lower James River Linear Park: develop a trail along the James River from Falling Creek to the City of Hopewell. • Appomattox River Linear Park: develop a trail along the Appomattox River from Hull Street Road to R. Garland Dodd Park at Point of Rocks. • Appomattox River Blueway: develop a water trail along the Appomattox River from Hull Street Road to R. Garland Dodd Park at Point of Rocks. 2018-2022 • Chester Linear Park: expand the existing park trail northward and southward along the former railroad bed to connect to the Lower James River Linear Park and Colonial Heights. • Falling Creek Linear Park: develop a trail along Falling Creek from Powhite Parkway to the James River. • Swift Creek Linear Park: develop a trail along Swift Creek from the Western Connector to Chester Linear Park. Post 2022 • Western Connector: develop a trail route from the Watkins Centre area to the Appomattox River. • Central Connector: develop a trail and ‘onroad’ route from the Robious Road area to Lake Chesdin Linear Park • Government Center: develop a trail route from the Government Center to the Pocahontas State Park trail system. General Services (Government Center, Aviation Services, Solid Waste, Fleet Management) Government Center Recommendations • Update the Government Center Master Plan to align with the recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan. Use the Master Plan to guide the development of the Government Center. • Promote the use and development of the Government Center for various educational, cultural, and other social events including tourism and other economic developmentrelated efforts. • Improve access to and within the Government Center through alternative modes of transportation including mass transit, pedestrian, and bicycle access. Aviation Services Recommendations • Use the Airport Master Plan to guide the development of the Chesterfield County Airport. • Continue to follow levels of service standards as determined by the Federal Aviation Administration and Virginia Department of Aviation. • Develop additional overlay standards that protect the current and future development and operation of the county’s airport from incompatible land uses. • Promote and protect the county’s airport and surrounding area as a vital economic development resource and catalyst. Solid Waste Recommendations • Establish and maintain convenient and cost-effective recycling programs countywide to reduce the amount of solid waste sent to landfills. • Encourage recycling efforts that exceed the state-mandated 25% recycling rate. • Encourage the expansion of recycling programs through cooperation with the Central Virginia Waste Management Authority and private sector efforts. • Maintain the use agreement with private sanitary landfill providers. • Maintain required environmental oversight of closed landfill sites. Fleet Maintenance Recommendations 2013-2017 • Northwest Fleet Facility: in the vicinity of Route 288 and Powhite Parkway on no more than 20 buildable acres and include school bus parking areas. Facility should be approximately 42,000 square feet and include a fueling center. This facility will replace the Walmsley Bus Facility. 2018-2022 (no new facilities are recommended during this period. Post 2022 • Central Fleet Facility: replace the current facility with a new facility in the vicinity of the Government Center on approximately 20 buildable acres and include school bus parking areas. Facility should be approximately 80,000 square feet and include radio shop operations, larger vehicle servicing, fueling center and administrative offices. This facility will replace the Consolidated Shop on Lori Road. • Southeast Fleet Facility: in the vicinity of Route 1 and Happy Hill Road on approximately 10 acres. Facility should be approximately 20,000 square feet and include a fueling center if needed. Telecommunication Facilities The following guidelines should be used when addressing telecommunication facilities. Site specific analysis will be performed through the zoning process and additional requirements may be suggested. These criteria should be reviewed and modified as new technology becomes available. • Design and Location Generally. Promote the design and location of telecommunications facilities to provide broad access to communication services, and minimize the numbers of towers and their impact on the surrounding area. • Location. The following options and guidelines should be used to determine the appropriate locations for telecommunications towers in the following priority:

• Encourage co-location on existing telecommunications towers rather than new freestanding structures.

• Encourage telecommunication facilities to be incorporated into existing building features such as rooftops, church steeples/ spires, water storage tanks, light poles and electrical transmission structures rather than constructing new freestanding structures.

• Where co-location or incorporation into an existing structure is not feasible, freestanding towers may be appropriate under the following circumstances:

• In areas designated for Residential

Agricultural or Rural Residential/

Agricultural uses on The Land Use Plan

Map, towers should not be located in highly visible areas. Further, natural features such as topography and streams should be used to provide transition between existing and future residential development.

• In areas either zoned or designated on

The Land Use Plan Map for residential development other than Residential

Agricultural or Rural Residential/

Agricultural uses; or in areas zoned or designated on The Land Use Plan Map for non-residential development other than

General Business or Industrial; or in high visibility areas, towers should be located and designed to conceal these facilities to the greatest degree feasible and minimize the visual impact.

• In areas zoned or designated on The

Land Use Plan Map for General Business or Industrial uses, the visual impact of the base of the tower should be minimized. • Design Criteria. The visual presence and prominence of freestanding towers should be minimized by:

• Locating where natural features such as topography or forested areas exist and will be maintained

• Obscuring or blocking views with other existing structures

• Using stealth designs to disguise and camouflage the appearance so as to resemble other structures (i.e. flagpoles, bell towers). When this is not feasible, the tower should be of a monopole design.

• Using a neutral color.

• Prohibiting lighting unless required by the Federal Aviation Administration

(FAA). If the FAA requires lighting, the lighting design should limit intensity, direction and timing. Implementation – The Implementation chapter identifies general steps necessary to carry out the goals and guidelines of the Plan. The steps fall into two categories: 1) Phase 1, which are steps that must be implemented quickly to carry out the Plan’s major goals and guidelines such as revitalization efforts, and 2) Phase 2, which are the steps that will occur over a period of time to refine and enhance existing ordinances and policies. Once the timeline for each step is established, a project scope will be developed for each step. The project scope will include identification of necessary resources to accomplish each step. Some steps may require resources beyond existing levels. PHASE 1: The various Phase 1 steps, and the timeline from date of Plan adoption for County staff to complete each step, are set forth below: • Prioritize Implementation. Formulate a broad project scope for each Phase 2 General Step. Board of Supervisors, following recommendation by the Planning Commission, sets priorities and timeframes for each Phase 2 General Step. (9 months) • Monitor Implementation. Provide report to Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors on status of each General Step. (Monthly) • Bridge the Gap Ordinance Amendments- Part 1. The existing ordinances refer to Plan areas in the existing Comprehensive Plan that have special development standards, such as Upper Swift Creek or Village areas. Ordinances will be revised to reference these same geographies under new descriptors which will remain in effect until new ordinances are developed and adopted, as deemed necessary through future Special Area Plan efforts. (3 months) • Utilities Ordinances. Amend ordinances relative to required use of public water and wastewater systems for new developments. (9 months). • Water and Wastewater Facilities Plan. Update the Water and Wastewater Facilities Plan to address countywide water and wastewater systems expansion and upgrades. Further, include an analysis of the long term infrastructure improvements necessary to provide wastewater service to the southwestern part of the county should the area designated for Rural Residential/ Agricultural and Residential Agricultural uses develop for other uses in the future. (9 months) • Public Facilities Coordination with Capital Improvement Program (CIP): Revise the administrative policy to require as part of the yearly CIP review: 1) a staff analysis as to whether the facilities comply with The Public Facilities Plan chapter, and 2) an annual evaluation of levels of service of each public facility category such as elementary, middle and high schools; parks; libraries; and fire stations. (3 months) • Revitalization Strategy: 1) Evaluate the organizational administrative structure and establish a structure to address revitalization (2 months) and 2) develop strategies to promote public and private commitments to enhance, restore and maintain the quality and diversity of neighborhoods and business corridors. (6 months) • Properties Zoned Contrary to The Recommendations of the Land Use Plan Chapter: 1) Identify properties zoned contrary to the recommendations of the Plan which, if developed under the current zoning, would have major implications on the Plan growth goals and guidelines (3 months) and 2) develop policies and ordinances to encourage such property owners to bring zoning into conformity with the Plan. (9 months) PHASE 2: The various Phase 2 steps are set forth below: • Bridge the Gap Ordinance Amendments- Part 2. Amend ordinances by reformatting into user friendly charts and graphics to provide the foundation for the Comprehensive Ordinance Amendments. • Comprehensive Ordinance Amendments. Amend ordinances to streamline processes, revise existing zoning districts and standards, and establish new zoning districts and standards such as mixed use. Additional revisions should address, where appropriate: airport overlay zone standards, open space, sidewalks, quality development and design standards, agri-tourism, agricultural districts that support continued agricultural and forestry activities and limited nonresidential uses, integration of environmental features in new developments, industrial uses and standards, mineral extraction and landfill standards, historic preservation, adaptive reuse of, and integration of, sites and structures in new developments and development standards for public facilities and places of worship uses in proximity to residential uses. • Water Quality. Amend ordinances to address: countywide application of Upper Swift Creek Ordinance standards such as setbacks from resource protection areas, reduction in the amount of impervious areas, and limited clearing in non-resource protection area floodplains, resource protection areas in open space for new developments, fertilizer and pesticide runoff from golf courses, and adequate erosion and sediment control devices when removing trees for the purpose of preparing land for future development (this would not impact tree removal associated with timbering or forestry operations). • Special Area Plans. Amend, update or reaffirm the following special area plans as well as develop other special area plans, as may be identified: The Jahnke/Chippenham Development Area Plan, The Bon Air Community Plan, The (Northern) Jefferson Davis Corridor Plan, (Eastern) Route 360 Corridor Plan, the Eastern Midlothian Plan, Midlothian Area Community Plan, The Chester Plan, Northern Courthouse Road Community Plan and, a proposed new special area plan, the Ettrick/Virginia State University (VSU) Study Area. Where appropriate, incorporate revitalization efforts in special area plans. • Revitalization Plans-Neighborhood Enhancement Areas. Develop neighborhood enhancement area plans for those areas identified through the Revitalization Strategy. Where appropriate, incorporate these plans in special area plans. • Revitalization Plans-Special Focus And Gateway Areas. Develop special focus and gateway area plans for the following areas as well as other areas as may be identified. Where appropriate, incorporate these plans in special area plans: Eastern Midlothian Turnpike, Eastern Route 360 Corridor, Meadowdale/ Meadowbrook Area, Northern Jefferson Davis Highway Corridor, Ettrick/Virginia State University (VSU). • Bicycle Accommodations Plan. Amend the Bikeway Plan to include types and recommended locations of various bike facilities and design guidelines for both onand off- road bicycle facilities. • Public Facilities Site Selection/Acquisition. Revise the administrative policy to incorporate recommendations of the Plan. • Reuse Of Public Facilities And Sites Or Sale Of Surplus County Owned Properties. Revise the administrative policy to incorporate recommendations of the Plan such as proactive review and evaluation of unused public facilities and sites to determine if reuse for another public facility would be appropriate or if the property should be sold as surplus. • Impacts on Public Facilities Evaluation. Revise the administrative methodology for evaluating development proposals’ impacts on public facilities in the zoning process to include consideration of the specific proposal along with other approved developments in each service area and their collective impacts on public facilities. • Erosion and Sediment Controls. Revise existing policies, where appropriate, to ensure that adequate erosion control measures are in place and properly maintained during development. • Other Policies. Revise the following policies, as necessary: Substantial Accord for Public Facilities, Infrastructure Financing to include Cash Proffer, Tower Siting, Residential Subdivision Connectivity, Stub Road and Residential Sidewalk. • Economic Development Opportunity Sites. Assess the following Economic Development Opportunity Sites as well as other areas as may be identified to determine infrastructure improvements necessary to support development. Identify funding alternatives or other actions to provide infrastructure to enhance the economic development opportunity site. Assessment could include transportation, water and wastewater needs; environmental conditions; and zoning that would impact development. Sites include: American Tobacco/Keck Site, Ashton Creek Business Center, CenterPointe, James River Industrial Center, Meadowville Technology Park, Watkins Centre, Branders Bridge Road Area, Western Route 360/Powhite Extension and Virginia State University/Ettrick Area. • Land Conservation Tools. Develop and enhance tools such as the land use taxation program, purchase of development rights and open space/conservation easements to encourage protection of environmental features, historic and cultural resources or other important features. • Underutilized or Vacant Properties. Identify non-residential underutilized or vacant properties and potential economic development opportunities. Develop strategies to encourage private reinvestment. • Infill Development. Define and Identify infill areas. • Transit. Identify transit needs and the viability of bus and rail service. • Private Individual On-Site Water And Wastewater (Wells, Septic Tanks and Alternative On-Site Septic Systems). Evaluate existing ordinances to determine if standards should be updated based on current technology and if so, amend ordinances appropriately. • Affordable/Workforce Housing. Identify needs and incentives for affordable housing. Where such housing is provided, consider architectural requirements for compatibility with market rate units within the same development. • Housing Maintenance, Rehabilitation and Renovation. Develop tools such as a design manual and identify funding sources to promote housing rehabilitation and renovation in Neighborhood Enhancement, and Special Focus and Gateway Areas. • Tourism. Develop strategies to promote sports, recreation, historical, cultural and environmental tourism programs. • Historical and Cultural Strategy. Develop strategies to promote protection and preservation of significant historical and cultural resources. • Reduce Water Demands. Develop strategies to reduce water consumption. • Virginia Stormwater Management Program. Develop ordinances and policies to ensure compliance with the Program. • Educational Programs. Develop educational programs and where appropriate, partner with the community, schools and libraries to educate the public on housing maintenance, water conservation practices, water resource protection such as daily practices, low impact designs, stream and shoreline erosion, and historical and cultural resources and preservation. • Best Management Practices (BMP) Teaching Opportunities In Conjunction With Public Facilities. Develop environmental awareness educational programs where appropriate at public facilities having water quality best management practices. • Public Facilities And Leadership In Energy And Environmental Design (LEED) Guidelines. Amend guidelines as necessary to ensure that where appropriate, facilities are constructed or renovated to be energy efficient and in a manner that meets the county strategic goal of being responsible protectors of the environment.

Board of Zoning Appeals of Chesterfield

Co on WednesdayOctober 3 2012 beginning at 1:00 pm in Public

Meeting Room at 10001 Iron Bridge Rd Chesterfield Va will consider the following requests. For complete listing & details of items on Board’s agenda visit www.chesterfield.gov/plan. 13AN0120: In Clover Hill Mag Dist POTTS MINTER & ASSOCIATES PC reqs variance for no public road frontage for dwelling purposes & amdt of zon dist map in A Dist on 2 acs lying at W terminus of Beatrice Ln 1070’ W of Old Courthouse Rd. Density is .5 u/ac. Comp Plan suggests office/res mixed use. 13AN0121: In Dale Mag Dis LORI A HILTON reqs special exception approval & amdt of zon dist map to permit a private kennel (keeping of 6 adult dogs) in R-TH Dist on .1 ac known as 4720 Brimley Pl. Density controlled by zon conds or ord. Comp Plan suggests res use of 2.51 – 4.0 dwell u/ac. All persons favoring opposing or interested in above are invited to appear at time & place herein stated & may speak. Copies of above requests are on file in Planning Dept at Chesterfield Co Community Dev Bldg 9800 Government Center Pkwy Chesterfield Va & at Co Admin’s Ofc Rm 504 at Lane B. Ramsey Admin Bldg for public examination during regular business hrs 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. Please check first with the Planning Dept. Comments &/or recommendations on above can be submitted to planning@ chesterfield.gov. soon thereafter as may be heard, the Board of Supervisors of Chesterfield County at its regular meeting place in the Public Meeting Room of Chesterfield County, Virginia, will consider the following ordinance for adoption: AN ORDINANCE to vacate a variable width rain garden drainage easement and a 16’ drainage easement within Open Space A, Magnolia Green, Section H-1 and a 20’ access and drainage easement across Lots 15 and 16, Magnolia Green, Section H-1, as shown on a plat by Townes Site Engineering, dated January 25, 2012, recorded March 13, 2012, in the Clerk's Office, Circuit Court, Chesterfield County, Virginia, in Plat Book 211, at Page 42. Information regarding the proposed ordinance is on file in the Right of Way Office in Chesterfield County, Virginia, and may be examined by all interested parties between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The hearing is held at a public facility designed to be accessible to persons with disabilities. Any persons with questions on the accessibility of the facility or need for reasonable accommodations should contact Janice B. Blakley, Clerk to the Board, at 748-1200. Persons needing interpreter services for the deaf must notify the Clerk to the Board no later than October 5, 2012. NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE

SALE 1519 Turner Road Richmond, VA, 23225 By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated July 28, 2006, and recorded in Deed Book 7268, Page 0361 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Chesterfield, VA, securing a loan which was originally $150,300.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Chesterfield County located at 9500 Courthouse Road on October 25, 2012 at 12:30 PM improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of the property, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. ALL that certain lot, piece or parcel of land, with improvements thereon and appurtenances thereto belonging, lying and being in Manchester Magisterial District, Chesterfield County, Virginia, containing 3.15 acres, more or less, as shown upon a blue print copy of a map made by W. W. LaPrade and Bros., dated March 9, 1945, and according to said plat is more particularly described as follows, to wit BEGINNING at an iron rod on the east line of Turner Road; thence N. 56 degrees 17" E. 456.45 feet to an iron pipe; thence S. 35 degrees 30" E. 313.15 feet to an iron rod; thence S. 56 degrees 17" W. 434.3 feet to the eastern line of said Turner Road; thence; on a curve along said road N. 25 degrees 11" W. a straight line of 90.67 feet with a radius of 206.29 feet to a point; thence N. 43 degrees 07" W. 226.22 feet to the iron rod at the point of beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT that portion of land conveyed to State Highway and Transportation Commissioner of Virginia, recorded October 1, 1986, in Deed Book 1802, page 1023. LESS AND EXCEPT that portion of land conveyed to Commonwealth Transportation commission of Virginia, recorded in Deed Book 2065, page 141. BEING the same property conveyed to Terrance Foster and Tiffany Foster (husband and wife), by Deed dated July 25, 2006, recorded prior hereto. TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $16,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale and Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments, including real property taxes, water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA dues or assessments, whether incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges or condo/HOA fees have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the Seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $295.00 for review of the settlement documents. Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: Rosenberg & Associates, LLC (Attorney for Commonwealth Trustees, LLC) 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 301-907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

Public Notice Off the Grid Cafe Corp Trading as: Off the Grid Cafe 14862 Hull St Rd Chesterfield Chesterfield, Virginia 23832-2533 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL for a Beer/wine on premise license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. MaryAnn Rosenberg, President Note: Objections to the issuance of this license must be submitted to ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required newspaper legal notices. Objections should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 804-552-3200.

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